Our Story

SIFCare or the Science of Identity Foundation Community Assistance for Responsible Existence
is the humanitarian arm of the Science of Identity Foundation working for the development
of enlightened, happy individuals and communities through various programs cultivating
wisdom, spiritual love and compassion.

 

Our slogan is Care in Action.

Our Vision

SIFCare is a dynamic, genuine humanitarian organization
working for the development of enlightened, happy individuals
and communities.

Our Mission

Our mission is to promote the cultivation of wisdom, spiritual love,
compassion, and actions motivated by such compassion in the service
of mankind and the environment.

Our Logo

The peacock feather depicts an eye, which symbolizes watchfulness and protection. It also appears like the arms of a person reaching out – embracing, caring. One set of arms reaches out to mankind and the other to the environment.

Gold represents the color of nature’s elements combined. Every natural element has a color representation. Air is white. Water is blue. Forest is green. Earth is brown. Ether is colorless with a background of the vastness of the blue sky. Gold represents the purity of the natural creation—representing fire/water/earth/air/forest in its pure form.

Our History

Founding Principles

Basic principles of the Science of Identity

Early Beginnings

The Succeeding Decades

The Years of Disasters

The Age of Technology

Founding Principles

SIF’s incorporations were largely motivated by the teachings of the science of identity, taught by the universal teacher Jagad Guru Siddhaswarupananda, who established the Science of Identity Foundation in the United States of America. He travelled to different countries, including the Philippines, to promote the wisdom of self-realization and genuine humanitarianism. He had always been a proponent of non-sectarianism and made it clear that it is not by joining an organization that one achieves success in life, rather, it is the individual understanding and application of real wisdom that a person achieves true happiness.

Basic principles of the Science of Identity

  1. We are non-material beings who are all connected to the Absolute Whole in the true sense of brotherhood.
  2. Genuine humanitarianism encompasses the realm of physical, mental and spiritual well-being of individuals.
  3. Selfless, voluntary work rendered in the service of mankind and the environment bring deep happiness to those who render such caring activities.

While people may try to associate SIF with various groups or single it out as a type of group, it is a key point to appreciate that the principles taught are called a science or truth that applies to all, regardless of sex, race or religion. Anyone—whether Christian, Buddhist, etc.—can apply such wisdom to their personal lives. Thus, we have volunteers coming from all walks of life, wanting to contribute in a simple way to help others and the environment.

Early Beginnings

Upon experiencing the benefits of thoroughly knowing oneself, the initial members of the Philippine organization felt enthused to share it with others through various programs. Due to the SIF Philippines Inc. operating independently of other overseas organizations, its members have always looked at local donors and themselves to financially support these programs. In terms of manpower, every project is moved by volunteers whose only compensation is the complete inner satisfaction it brings to their lives.

SIF’s first projects included a magazine type publication called Haribol Philippines, and a TV show featuring the magazine’s contents for wider broadcast. The show “Jagad Guru Speaks” aired during the 1980’s on ABS-CBN and later on moved to Channel 13. In due course of time, the magazine was reformatted into booklet form for easier distribution. To date, Life Force series has more than 40 issues that encompass a wide range of societal and personal topics such as drug abuse, marital issues, suicide, nervous breakdowns, and depression, among others.

The Succeeding Decades

As the cost of airtime spiraled, the organization found it difficult to purchase block time and the television series was pulled off the air. By this time, however, the number of volunteers had increased from a 20 to 100, and each member then took it upon themselves to promote the cultivation of wisdom and volunteerism by personally taking the challenge of giving seminars in schools, offices, barangays, and even correctional facilities.

Speakers came from various sectors of society—martial artists, teachers, musicians, businessmen—making their contribution by simply volunteering their time and resources to help others while the organization functioned to provide materials in the form of booklets, brochures, and teaching manuals. SIF speakers were invited to give lectures in schools such as the De La Salle University, Adamson, Ateneo, UP, and even the Philippine Military Academy. The members also found great opportunities in various provinces and began doing volunteer work wherever they settled. From Manila, the organization eventually branched out to areas in Iloilo, La Union, Bohol and Lucena. Today, the SIF has around 500 volunteers nationwide.

The Years of Disasters

The heart of a volunteer cares for others in need, and it was only natural that when devastating typhoons struck the country, SIF members sprung to action. During the Ondoy relief work, SIF volunteers cooked and delivered pots of food and filtered water to typhoon victims. Volunteers meanwhile helped clear blocked roads and distribute rice and other necessities when Typhoon Pepeng hit the northern region. It was Yolanda that especially motivated friends and relatives of SIF members abroad to send in donations, allowing SIF volunteers to stay for as long as six months in Bogo, Cebu and Estancia, Iloilo to offer assistance to the typhoon victims.

The compassionate work of the volunteers led one beneficiary to write, “SIF gave us hope and strength to face the tragedy. We are grateful that we met you people. You—land—a–mong us.” The very deep impact that SIF volunteerism created among people in disaster-struck communities awakened the members to continue sustainable programs in various areas. There is no need to wait for disasters. People can be taught and assisted in various ways to live a more responsible existence even before a disaster strikes.

The Age of Technology

The Philippine population is growing at the rate of 2% annually, and the need to assist communities is growing as well. Through modern media, the SIF wishes to not only update numerous members and friends abroad but also inform local citizens and get them more involved in SIFCare programs.

 

What We Do

 

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